for-all-mankind:

justcopypasting:

80

И продолжаем любить…

Any translators care to share what this says?

(Source: kzmkwoji)

Reblog 13/03/14 URL

humanoidhistory:

R.I.P. Valery Kubasov (Вале́рий Куба́сов), the Russian cosmonaut best known for his participation in the 1975 Apollo-Soyuz mission. He passed away on February 19, 2014, at the age of 79. Here are some fun facts about his amazing life culled from various obituaries:

  • "Kubasov, twice named Hero of the Soviet Union, flew in space three times, including on the historic Apollo-Soyuz mission in 1975 that saw an American Apollo and Soviet Soyuz spacecraft dock with one another." (RIA Novosti)
  • "The cosmonauts and the astronauts — Brig. Gen. Thomas P. Stafford, and Deke Slayton and Vance D. Brand, both civilians — spent 44 hours together, exchanging gifts and conducting scientific experiments, while their spacecraft were linked." (New York Times)
  • "Later, at a space-to-ground conference attended by both crews, he expressed his hope as an engineer that their work would pave the way for a time “when space will have whole plants, factories, for the production of new materials." (The Telegraph)
  • "On his first space mission, aboard Soyuz 6 in October 1969, he carried out the first vacuum welding in space, fusing different types of metals with an electric gun to set the stage for extensive welding work on future missions in zero gravity." (NYT)
  • Kubasov was “reported to have broken out in a medley of songs during that mission, seemingly out of character, bringing laughter from the craft’s commander, Lt. Col. Georgi Shonin.” (NYT)
  • Of the Earth, he said “there is nothing more beautiful than our blue planet.” (The Telegraph)
  • "Mr. Kubasov’s third and final space mission came in spring 1980, when he joined with Bertalan Farkas, the first Hungarian in space, on a docking with the Soviet Union’s Salyut 6 orbiting station." (NYT)
  • His wife described him as “calm, restrained, not excitable.” (NYT)
  • "Kubasov, originally trained as an engineer, remained active as a manager and technical consultant in Russian space projects in the post-Soviet era." (RIA Novosti)

Please note: In the two-shot photos, he is pictured with fellow cosmonaut Aleksei A. Leonov.

(Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5)

(via scienceyoucanlove)

Reblog 05/03/14 URL
Has anyone read this? It’s several volumes, right?

Has anyone read this? It’s several volumes, right?

(Source: interstellar-barbarella, via tobwaylan)

Reblog 22/02/14 URL
zemiorka:

 Misión lunar de las naves soviéticas Zond. Estas naves, derivadas de las Soyuz, estaban diseñadas para realizar un sobrevuelo a la Luna y regresar a Tierra, y potencialmente podían haber transportado a un cosmonauta a la Luna. En su lugar llevaron diversos especímenes biológicos, entre ellos tortugas.-
 Fuente de la infografía: Ciudad Futura.-

zemiorka:

 Misión lunar de las naves soviéticas Zond. Estas naves, derivadas de las Soyuz, estaban diseñadas para realizar un sobrevuelo a la Luna y regresar a Tierra, y potencialmente podían haber transportado a un cosmonauta a la Luna. En su lugar llevaron diversos especímenes biológicos, entre ellos tortugas.-

 Fuente de la infografía: Ciudad Futura.-

Reblog 22/02/14 URL
fyeahcosmonauts:

Sergei Korolyov, Chief Designer, talking to Valentina Tereshkova before her flight. (1963)
(Energia)

fyeahcosmonauts:

Sergei Korolyov, Chief Designer, talking to Valentina Tereshkova before her flight. (1963)

(Energia)

Reblog 21/02/14 URL
russiamagazine:

Soviet poster promoting science, 1970s

jtotheizzoe:

"Glory to the first female cosmonaut!" reads the top poster. June 16 marks the 50th anniversary of Valentina Tereshkova’s trip to space, the first woman to make the leap beyond Earth.

Find out how her mission aboard Vostok-6 worked.

Reblog 21/02/14 URL
spiritofapollo:

Valentina Tereshkova, first woman in space, with her medals.

spiritofapollo:

Valentina Tereshkova, first woman in space, with her medals.

Reblog 21/02/14 URL
senior-crown:

for-all-mankind:

spaceexp:

Космонавт / Kosmonaut
Source: Dr. Robusto

I just bought something similar; pictures soon!

Here’s mine:

More info on the patch here.

senior-crown:

for-all-mankind:

spaceexp:

Космонавт / Kosmonaut

Source: Dr. Robusto

I just bought something similar; pictures soon!

Here’s mine:

More info on the patch here.

Reblog 20/02/14 URL

for-all-mankind:

spacewatching:

Russian landing on the moon.  All drawn by Serge Gracieux

Beautiful drawings of events in an alternate timeline.

Reblog 17/02/14 URL

Valentina Tereshkova, the pilot of Vostok 6 and the first woman in space

(Source: , via spacecentral)

Reblog 14/02/14 URL
2 JAN 1959: Officially, the Soviets had no interest in landing a man on the moon. Officially. In reality, they were taking small steps and making giant leaps every day. The Luna 1 spacecraft, pictured above, was meant to crash into the moon and send back reams of data. Instead, the probe missed its target, much to the chagrin of Korolev and Khrushchev. 

Accomplishments
came within 6,000 kilometers of the moon, a record for the day
on missing the moon, it entered orbit around the sun—the first “man made planet”
most reliable measurements of the solar wind
released a sodium cloud while 120,000 kilometers from earth. The glowing trail was visible from earth, making it the first “artificial comet”

2 JAN 1959: Officially, the Soviets had no interest in landing a man on the moon. Officially. In reality, they were taking small steps and making giant leaps every day. The Luna 1 spacecraft, pictured above, was meant to crash into the moon and send back reams of data. Instead, the probe missed its target, much to the chagrin of Korolev and Khrushchev. 

Accomplishments

  • came within 6,000 kilometers of the moon, a record for the day
  • on missing the moon, it entered orbit around the sun—the first “man made planet”
  • most reliable measurements of the solar wind
  • released a sodium cloud while 120,000 kilometers from earth. The glowing trail was visible from earth, making it the first “artificial comet”
Reblog 07/02/14 URL
Feeling so embarrassed.  These dogs are actually Veterok and Ugolyok (Little Breeze and Little Lump of Coal) who made their successful flight in 1966. 
Legendary Belka & Strelka (Стрелка—pronounced closer to “StrAY-elka”) became Heroes of the People. Unlike their poor predecessor, they went into space and actually returned unharmed.

Feeling so embarrassed.  These dogs are actually Veterok and Ugolyok (Little Breeze and Little Lump of Coal) who made their successful flight in 1966. 

Legendary Belka & Strelka (Стрелка—pronounced closer to “StrAY-elka”) became Heroes of the People. Unlike their poor predecessor, they went into space and actually returned unharmed.

Reblog 06/02/14 URL

The idea was to create a screen printed board game for children and young-at-heart adults. It charts the journey of two genuine Soviet space dogs (Bolik and ZIB) into space. The colour scheme is red, yellow and black, mimicking that of propaganda”

(Bolik and ZIB never actually met—“ZIB” is a Russian acronym for Замена Исчезнувшему Болику or, “substitute for missing Bolik,” who had run away before the launch.)

(Source: cargocollective.com)

Reblog 05/02/14 URL
“Right from the very beginning, Yuri Gagarin has been keeping a watchful eye, as it were, on the International Space Station Expeditions, as his portrait is in pride of place in the Russian Zvezda module.”

Right from the very beginning, Yuri Gagarin has been keeping a watchful eye, as it were, on the International Space Station Expeditions, as his portrait is in pride of place in the Russian Zvezda module.”

(Source: enjoyspace.com)

Reblog 05/02/14 URL
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